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Published by Top Line Roofing Contractors on Nov. 24, 2021

A new roof is a significant step forward in the reconstruction of an Orlando woman’s house. Donations from News 6 viewers and contractors keep the project going forward. Theresa DeFairia is one step closer to finding a new place to live. On her 1940s house, construction teams have finished substantial deconstruction work, rebuilt trusses, shored up the foundation, and framed the walls.

A new roof is the most recent evidence of development. 1st Class Roofing contributed both labor and materials to the project. The sound of a compressor and a nail gun rang over the Parramore neighborhood, and DeFairia was overjoyed.

“Pop, pop, pop, and I knew those shingles were going on,” DeFairia observed. “I exclaimed, hallelujah.” Local Information Theresa DeFairia is one step closer to finding a new place to live. On her 1940s house, construction teams have finished substantial deconstruction work, rebuilt trusses, shored up the foundation, and framed the walls.

A new roof is the most recent evidence of development.

1st Class Roofing contributed both labor and materials to the project. The sound of a compressor and a nail gun rang over the Parramore neighborhood, and DeFairia was overjoyed. “Pop, pop, pop, and I knew those shingles were going on,” DeFairia observed. “I exclaimed, hallelujah.” 32 Pershing Place has been much too quiet for far too long.

“Today is a special day. Today is a significant day. When the truck arrived, I felt like a small kid. “I was up there doing this,” DeFairia clapped. “I was overjoyed.” Glenn Roberts, the owner of 1st Class Roofing, stood by and watched as his crew installed row after row of shingles.

“We discovered the initiative last year and fell in love with the tale,” Roberts said, adding that he attempts to gift one roof to deserving homes each year. “It struck our hearts, and we thought, ‘This is something we have to do,'” Roberts added. “It just seems right.”

After the City of Orlando was about to condemn her property, News 6 first published her story in 2020.

DeFairia survives on disability and social security. It’s enough to cover the mortgage payment but not much else. Over time, the house deteriorated into what most people would consider uninhabitable. During a storm, a tree limb fell on the roof, inflicting damage. Water infiltration then occurred. Despite everything, DeFairia is full of life, enthusiasm, and hope.

“I believe it’s wonderful, especially in its raggedy state,” DeFairia added, recalling years gone by. “When I see it, it’s all rejuvenated and restored to me.”

The property drew the attention of code enforcement, who issued a notice to condemn if it was not cleaned up and water and electricity supply was not restored. DeFairia has three days to comply with the order. DeFairia began making urgent phone calls. Carolina Escobar, a friend, responded.

Escobar first encountered “Ms. Theresa,” as she is affectionately known, while delivering Meals on Wheels. The two became excellent friends, but DeFairia kept her living situation hidden. “No one knew she was living this way,” Escobar explained.

Escobar promptly turned to social media, organizing a weekend cleaning and eventually establishing a GoFundMe campaign. DeFairia got gifts and community support after her story appeared on News6. However, development has been gradual. Contractors discovered serious structural flaws. Permitting caused further more delays.

Escobar has sought assistance from politicians and non-profit organizations. DeFairia had been staying with friends the entire time. The CEO of The Central Florida Regional Housing Trust, Frank Wells, has provided advice.

“This is a significant task.” “But this isn’t the first time we’ve heard a tale like this,” Wells added. “We know that for someone like her who has lived in a house she loves for a long time and is comfortable here, this is a beautiful place to be, and any other conclusion would result in a slew of extra bills as well as compromising her health.”

Escobar’s determination to assist her buddy, according to Wells, is admirable.

“She’s been a true community hero in making this happen,” added Wells.

“It’s simply incredible, and I can’t think how Ms. Theresa would go through this without the help of the community.”
Orange Avenue Construction has agreed to work on the project. Anthony Roy, the home’s owner, anticipates that the house will be closed in shortly and that work will begin on the inside. There is still a long way to go before DeFaria can return.

DeFairia had depended on faith up to this moment. All of her newfound assistance has just cemented her conviction. “I want to remain because I like it here,” DeFairia explained. “This is where God directed me.” If you want to assist Ms. Theresa, please contact Commissioner Regina Hill of the City of Orlando. DeFairia has a GoFundMe page where you may give.

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